Bokor Hill was once a resort meant to provide French immigrants a respite from the harsh heat and humidity in Cambodia.  The crowning glory of this small town was the Bokor Hill Station, a large hotel/casino.  The entire town was abandoned and now stands as a favorite place of backpackers who want to avoid the tourist scenes in the large Cambodian cities.

Notes, September 25, 2011

The Maunsell Forts were small fortified towers built in the Thames and Mersey estuaries during the Second World War to help defend theUnited Kingdom. They were named after their designer, Guy Maunsell. The forts were decommissioned in the late 1950s and later used for other activities. One became the Principality of Sealand; boats visit the remaining forts occasionally, and a consortium called Project Redsands is planning to conserve the fort situated at Redsand.

0 notes, September 25, 2011

Construction began on the retro-futuristic Sanzhi Pod City in Taiwan in 1978, but was abandoned in 1980 due to lack of investment and construction-related deaths.  Also known as the “UFO Houses” on account of their saucer-like shape, or even the Ruins of the Future, Sanzhi aimed to attract U.S. military personnel serving in East Asia.  While it never hosted a single tourist, the abandoned resort nevertheless found itself on theurban exploration map as thousands flocked to photograph the mysterious modern ruins – now destroyed.

Construction began on the retro-futuristic Sanzhi Pod City in Taiwan in 1978, but was abandoned in 1980 due to lack of investment and construction-related deaths.  Also known as the “UFO Houses” on account of their saucer-like shape, or even the Ruins of the Future, Sanzhi aimed to attract U.S. military personnel serving in East Asia.  While it never hosted a single tourist, the abandoned resort nevertheless found itself on theurban exploration map as thousands flocked to photograph the mysterious modern ruins – now destroyed.


0 notes, September 23, 2011

Above is the North Wales Hospital (Denbigh Asylum), complete with mortuary and autopsy table, which opened in 1848 and has been abandoned since 1995.

Above is the North Wales Hospital (Denbigh Asylum), complete with mortuary and autopsy table, which opened in 1848 and has been abandoned since 1995.


5 notes, September 23, 2011

The Linda Vista Hospital

The Linda Vista Hospital in East L.A. was built in 1938 as a hospital for railroad employees, and was reportedly occupied by Howard Hughes a time or two before it closed in 1990. Parts of the films Outbreak, End of Days, Boogeyman 2 and the pilot for the television show E.R. were shot in its creepy, mold-infested abandoned rooms. Writer-directorRansom Riggs took these photos while scouting the location for another film shoot.

0 notes, September 22, 2011

Abandoned Russian Waterpark

This abandoned Russian water park was under construction when a deadly accident at another Russian water park, Transvaal, killed 28 people. At this point, construction was halted due to safety concerns. This 12-story structure was to include 3 underground floors, 5 pools, water slides, an athletic arena, a sports gambling palace, a hotel for nonresident athletes, offices, cafes, a medical center and a sports medicine center. The site was purchased in 2007 to make way for a shopping center, but it has yet to be demolished.

0 notes, September 22, 2011

Built by the New York Central Railroad from 1927 - 1929, the Buffalo Central Terminal was constructed to serve the booming Buffalo rail industry. Designed by architects Alfred T. Fellheimer and Steward Wagner, the art deco station was designed to accommodate 200 trains per day, or 3,200 passengers per hour. Along with the main concourse, the station also consists of a 17-story office tower, a four story baggage building, a two story mail building, and train concourse.

Due to a decline in train use, the building was put on the market in 1959 for $1 million, a fourth of its original cost. A shaky period of railroad mergers and building owners continues until Amtrak abandoned the terminal in 1979. The station suffered years of neglect as the property changed hands; the last auctioned price was for $100,000 in 1986. The train concourse (where the passengers boarded) remained under Amtrak authority, and was leased to a private contractor for heavy equipment storage. The bridge that connected the train concourse to the rest of the facility was demolished in 1981 to allow freight train passage.

In 1997 the property was transferred to the Central Terminal Restoration Corporation for preservation. After the removal of 250 tons of debris, asbestos abatement, and other repairs, the terminal opened for tours in 2003.

0 notes, September 22, 2011

The City of Pripyat, Ukraine

Pripyat was founded on February 4th, 1970. The main reason for the city foundation was construction and further exploitation of Chernobyl nuclear power plant - one of the largest in Europe - which gave the reason to call Pripyat a city of nuclear power professionals. Pripyat became the ninth nuclear power city in the Soviet Union.

The population of the city was 47,500 (in November 1985), it was the last census held before evacuation. Originally Pripyat was planned for 75,000-78,000 people.

Pripyat was a convenient transportation juncture in Polesye area due to railway station Yanov located rather close, a landing stage on the river Pripyat and highways.

The population of Pripyat was evacuated on April 27th, 1986, due to Chernobyl accident. A new town-sputnik Slavutich was built about 50 km from the nuclear power station for the staff working at it.

Pripyat is known all over the world for Chernobyl disaster happened at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The population of the city was about 49,400 before the disaster (April 26, 1986). After the disaster Pripyat was abandoned. The city is known as a ghost city now.

Pripyat is one of favorite places among tourists and scientists all over the world.

To read more about the Chernobyl Accident go here -

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/chernobyl/inf07.html

0 notes, September 22, 2011

The Foster State Hospital

This institution has a long and somewhat confusing history, starting way back to its founding in 1797. The original hospital held many roles during its infancy, including caring for the insane, paupers, sick and disabled seamen, as well as providing general health care. It was privately owned until the state took control of the institution in 1834, where the main building was found in disrepair and subsequently rebuilt. The hospital began only treating the insane around this time, however by 1839 overcrowding was an issue. Partly influenced by mental health reformer Dorthea Dix, the hospital was relocated out of the city and onto a rural tract of land in 1852 to accommodate larger buildings and a farm - and where it still operates to this day.

Construction began on a large Italianate-style main building in 1853 following the Kirkbride plan, suited to hold 250 patients. Problems began even before the building was completed though - funds to build the new asylum ran dry, and the onset of the Civil War halted construction for a few years. It finally opened in 1872, but without sufficient equipment, furniture, staffing and funds for standard operating costs. With money borrowed from private lenders and some reorganization, the hospital started to pull itself together. Mechanical restraints were discontinued in 1878, and the institution expanded to include more farm buildings, laundry, upholstery, tin, shoe and metal shops. The acreage of land increased fourfold from the original parcel. More treatment buildings were constructed in the 1920s to care for mentally ill veterans of the first World War, although they were used for chronic patients within a few years once a nearby veterans hospital was completed. Other structures including a forensic (criminal) building, theater, and athletic field were built in the 1930s through the 1940s.

The construction of new treatment buildings continued well into the 1960s; they replaced the antiquated structures on the campus. Some, including the historic Kirkbride building, were razed, while others were left abandoned or used for storage. The hospital still operates to this day, providing acute, sub-acute, and long-term psychiatric care to adult and geriatric patients.

(Source: http)

0 notes, September 22, 2011

talysadele:

The Kowloon Walled City was located just outside Hong Kong, China during British rule.

A former watchpost to protect the area against pirates, it was occupied by Japan during World War II and subsequently taken over by squatters after Japan’s surrender.

Neither Britain nor China wanted responsibility for it, so it became its own lawless city.

Its population flourished for decades, with residents building labyrinthine corridors above the street level, which was clogged with trash.

The buildings grew so tall that sunlight couldn’t reach the bottom levels and the entire city had to be illuminated with fluorescent lights.

It was a place where brothels, casinos, opium dens, cocaine parlors, food courts serving dog meat and secret factories ran unmolested by authorities.

It was finally torn down in 1993 after a mutual decision was made by British and Chinese authorities, who had finally grown wary of the unsanitary, anarchic city and its out-of-control population.

Reblogged from tlullfitz-deactivated20111011-d, 27 notes, September 22, 2011